CHES 2021 Virtual Banner 800x173

41st Annual Conference of the
Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society

September 28 - 29, 2021

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 29, 2021

All times quoted in Central Time

 
1005-1045 TRACK 6: Concurrent Sessions 6A, 6B, 6C 
TRACK 6A  Leveraging Strategic Partnerships to Enhance Healthcare Through Innovation 
Speakers:  Michael Pringle. Senior Business Consultant, P.Eng, Honeywell, Markham ON
David Diamond, President & CEO, Eastern Regional Health Authority, St. John’s, NL
Overview:  David will discuss his challenges running a geographically dispersed, multisite organization, serving a diverse demographic, while continuously looking for opportunities to improve the patient experience by leveraging new ideas, technology & innovation through partnerships. Michael will share how Eastern partnered with Honeywell to collaborate on solutions for infrastructure renewal, enhancing patient environments, infection prevention and cost reduction. They will explore how EH continues to leverage this partnership to tackle emerging challenges, including pandemic response strategies.

Eastern Health has embarked on an exciting journey of innovation - including leveraging public and industry partners with expertise in technology solutions in order to put Eastern Health at the forefront of health-care innovation. This strategy comes with a great level of executive support. During this session President and CEO David Diamond will talk about Eastern Health’s challenges as a large multi-site organization, spanning a widespread geography serving a diverse demographic. Part of the challenge is that Newfoundland has an aging population, and the birth rate is not keeping pace - leading to increased health and hospital expenditures per capita which are not sustainable. Eastern Health believes that these challenges present opportunities for leadership and innovation and have established key strategic private sector partnerships to ensure their success.

David Diamond will talk about the launch of Eastern’s Innovation Strategy which articulates a path to achieve their vision – one that positions them to leverage innovation to improve patient care and to elevate Eastern Health as a leader in the Canadian health sector. He will also discuss the importance of leveraging partnerships on this journey.

Michael Pringle of Honeywell will discuss one such partnership – a strategic collaboration between Honeywell & Eastern Health with the overarching goal of delivering comprehensive, value-based solutions to the healthcare organization. Of key concern to Eastern Health, was their aging infrastructure, rising costs and decreasing capital budgets. In October 2018, Eastern Health underwent a procurement process to identify and select a strategic partner to implement its Energy and Facility Renewal Program. By upgrading and retrofitting identified facilities and equipment across the eastern region, the program is helping Eastern Health conserve energy, reduce rising utility costs and decrease overall operational costs, while shrinking the organization’s environmental footprint by lowering emissions. As Eastern’s project partner, Honeywell replaced dated, less-efficient systems with technology that reduces electricity and fuel consumption, as well as maintenance costs. The Honeywell partnership surpassed traditional energy and required facility renewal measures, and also incorporated new and innovative UV technology in buildings Air Handling Units to achieve improved infection prevention & control. The project measures implemented improve the overall environment and comfort for patients.

The partnership between Honeywell & Eastern Health continues to push the envelope beyond the initial program as new and emerging challenges arise. Given the severity of the Covid-19 pandemic, Honeywell conducted healthy building audits at each hospital site to identify potential pandemic response solutions that will better protect patients, staff & visitors. During these audits, Honeywell explored and vetted a variety of in-house and third-party technology solutions which will be shared during the presentation.

Objectives: At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Identify opportunities for strategic partnerships and collaboration within your organization.
•  Identify potential facility & technology solutions that may be applicable within your organization.
•  Understand the process to engage in a strategic private partnership.
TRACK 6B  Environmental Controls for Hospitals and the Impact on Patient Safety 
Speaker: Don MacDonald, Northern Regional Manager, Phoenix Controls, Kincardine ON
David Rausch, Business Development Manager, Healthcare and Research Markets, Phoenix Controls, Boston MA
Overview: Hospital Acquired Infections and Surgical Site infections are a growing costly, concern. The presentation will explore, the impact of the environment and how it is becoming more of a target of study and interest to manage the infection risk. A critical component to aseptic design in any procedure room is control of the airborne environment, including air flow direction, speed, temperature, humidity and air change rates, as well as microbial and particle contamination.

HAI (Healthcare Acquired Infections) and SSI’s (Surgical Site infections) are a growing costly, concern within our Healthcare Facilities. The Impact of the environment is becoming more and more of a target of study and interest to manage the infection risk. In ORs, procedure rooms and ICUs, a more wholistic approach to analyzing and controlling environmental parameters is necessary to point to or even predict, in near real time, the increase in risk of microbial contamination inside and outside aseptic zones. A critical component to aseptic design in any procedure room is control of the airborne environment, including air flow direction, speed, temperature, humidity and air change rates, as well as microbial and particle contamination.

Additionally, current code compliant environmental parameters like; unidirectional, downward flow of dedicated air over the sterile field, (minimal blockages from lights and equipment booms) maintenance of proper room positive pressure, relative humidity, temperature, air velocity and air change rates are also essential to maintaining asepsis during procedure times). However, these environmental control methods are often focused over the sterile field leaving unprotected areas of the OR with uncontrolled, fluctuating, environmental parameters in zones with little or no air flow and increased risk for contamination.

This presentation will introduce a new partnered solution and concept of addressing the above conditions by correlating the relationship between the airborne environmental parameters and the potential for elevated contamination risk. In addition, we will share the results from a 3rd party, which tests a proposed engineering control solution that may improve outcomes by reducing the risk of wound site infections through improved environmental contamination control which optimizes procedure rooms and allows ICUs to be more safely used as procedure rooms when needed.

Objectives:  At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Identify the impact of the environment and how it is becoming more of a target of study and interest to manage the infection risk.
•  Describe the environment with respect to being a critical component to aseptic design in any procedure room is control of the airborne environment, including air flow direction, speed, temperature, humidity and air change rates, as well as microbial and particle contamination.
•  Share the results from a 3rd party, which tests a proposed engineering control solution that may improve outcomes by reducing the risk of wound site infections through improved environmental contamination control which optimizes procedure rooms and allows ICUs to be more safely used as procedure rooms when needed.
•  Introduce: concept of addressing the environmental risk by correlating the relationship between the airborne environmental parameters and the potential for elevated contamination risk. In ORs, procedure rooms and ICUs, a more wholistic approach to analyzing and controlling environmental parameters is necessary to point to or even predict, in near real time, the increase in risk of microbial contamination inside and outside aseptic zones. 
TRACK 6C  Impact of COVID-19 on Long Term Care and the Role of Technology
Speaker:  Alex Mihailidis, PhD, PEng., Associate Vice-President, International Partnerships; Professor, University of Toronto; Scientific Director, AGE-WELL Network of Centres of Excellence
Overview: Over the past 18 months we have seen a devastating impact of COVID-19 on the residents, caregivers, and staff in Long-Term Care Homes. This impact has led to a significant decrease in the quality of life of LTC residents, and has shown that change in needed in order to better serve our older Canadians and those who provide care to these individuals. This session will provide an overview of the current state of LTC and how it has changed because of COVID-19. The session will present the type of issues that have been seen and how technology could play a role in improving the current conditions in LTC homes, and how technology can be used to prevent a repeat of what we have all witnessed over the past year. Finally, the session will present an update on current work that is being completed to develop national standards for LTC homes, both from an infrastructure and a care perspective.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Learn about the impact that COVID-19 has had on the Long-Term Care Sector
2)  Understand how technology can play a role in supporting LTC and the residents and staff
3)  Learn about work being completed on new national standards for LTC
1045-1100 Transition / Break
1100-1150  TRACK 7:  Plenary Session
  CHES President's Welcome, Award Presentations
1150-1200 Transition / Break
1200-1245  TRACK 8: CONCURRENT SESSIONS 8A, 8B, 8C 
TRACK 8A  Wayfinding: Accessible Design for the Built Environment 
Speakers: Allison Moz, Wayfinding Partner, eyecandy SIGNS INC., Halifax NS 
Dan McClinton, Owner, DMC Wayfinding and Design Inc. 
Overview:  With an aging population and new national accessibility standards, wayfinding is a critical – though often overlooked – tool needed to improve the holistic experience of a hospital. Reaching far beyond building code Allison will share the principles that inform CSA B651-18, and will demonstrate the risks, opportunities and benefits of accessible wayfinding in healthcare.

One in seven adult Canadians currently live with a disability: this number is expected to increase significantly over the next twenty years. StatsCan reports that 1 in 3 seniors have a disability and by 2035 over 9 million seniors will outnumber children 3:2. The “Silver Tsunami” is challenging the way we incorporate accessibility to account for a wide range disabilities.
With the government implementing national accessibility legislation through the Accessible Canada Act, accessibility is at the forefront of the conversation when building and improving hospitals and long term care facilities. We will review CSA B651-18 Accessible design for the built environment, which will set the backdrop for a deeper understanding of the role wayfinding plays in achieving our accessibility for everyone.

The goal of accessibility is inclusivity. There is no more crucial setting than healthcare to lead this initiative. With a focus on wayfinding as a key tenet of increased accessibility, Allison will illustrate how wayfinding helps to move visitors through a healthcare facility with confidence and efficiency, not only influencing how they perceive their experience, but ultimately improving the facility’s bottom line. We will learn how accessibility benefits all visitors and how the healthcare industry can be leaders in addressing the evolving priorities of the public.

Objectives:  At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Provide an overview of accessibility in Canada
•  Explain the role of wayfinding in healthcare
•  List the tools needed for a functional wayfinding system that can be updated as the building continues to evolve.
•  Illustrate the principles behind accessible wayfinding in the built environment with case studies from hospitals across Canada.
TRACK 8B  Creating Smart Hospitals:  Enhancing patient experiences, reducing staff workloads and improving operating results using loT 
Speaker:  Jerry Folsom, Director, Smart Hospitals & Healthcare Solutions – North America , Siemens Smart Infrastructure, Siemens Canada Limited, Oakville ON
Overview:  Improving patient experiences, driving better operating results and enhancing clinical and operational staff experiences are central to Siemens' vision for the future of healthcare. To execute this vision, Siemens is using IoT technologies along with new integrated solutions to create smart hospitals using cost effective approaches. In this presentation, we will discuss a number of these approaches including how to enable visionary patient experiences, reduce clinical workloads, improve patient outcomes and streamline to reduce costs.

Improving patient experiences, driving better operating results and enhancing clinical and operational staff experiences make up Siemens' vision for the future of healthcare. To execute that vision, Siemens is using IoT technologies along with new solutions and services to help create smart hospitals with cost effective approaches.

In this session, we will discuss a number of the approaches that can be used to create a smart hospital. One example that we will discuss is how a hospital used a renovation project as an opportunity to provide patients with the ability to control their environment. Working closely with the client and their nurse call vendor, Siemens provided an ability for patients to control HVAC, lighting and shades with the nurse call pillow speaker. This method was easy to install and simple for the patient to understand and use. Ongoing, the solution is one that is easily used by the clinical and facilities team – there wasn’t a totally new system deployed that they had to learn.

With this solution, the client was able to achieve their goal of giving patients control while keeping construction costs and ongoing expenses contained. Early feedback from patients and the clinical team is that the new solution has been well received and providing the expected benefits of improved patient experiences and reduced calls to clinical & facilities team members. In addition, the potential for reduced patient falls has been decreased due to patients not getting out of bed. All of this has been accomplished without adding major expenses to the project.
In addition to patient experience improvements, we will look at an example of how smart hospital capabilities were used to reduce operating costs. By leverage data, patient rooms are put into an energy saving mode when patients are discharged from the hospital resulting in operational savings. When patients arrive, the rooms are put into a mode that is comfortable for the patient. All of this is achieved using data without having to install additional equipment in patient rooms.

Our session will look at a variety of methods that can be used to improve the patient experience, reduce operating costs, simplify ongoing maintenance and reduce construction costs. Also, we will look at methods of engagement that provide an opportunity to achieve these results and reduce construction costs and risks. The focus of our session will be to demonstrate how you can cost effectively approach implementing a visionary smart hospital.

Objectives  At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Identify opportunities that exist to improve patient experiences and operating results
•  List technologies that can be used to enhance clinical and operational staff experiences
•  Describe how to the Internet of Things (IoT) and other technologies can be used to create smart hospitals
•  Identify concepts that can be helpful with clinical and operational staff conversations about benefits of smart hospitals and IoT technologies.
•  Identify cost effective and innovative approaches that can be used to create smart healthcare facilities that reduce and/or implementation construction costs.
TRACK 8C  New Standard:  CSA Z8003. (design research and post occupancy evaluation) 
Speakers:  Robin Snell, Chair Z8003
Cliff Harvey, Vice Chair, Z8003
1245-1315  Transition / Lunch Break 
1315-1400 TRACK 9: Concurrent Sessions 9A, 9B, 9C 
TRACK 9A The New Waterford Hub Complex: A different approach to Health, LTC, Education and Communities Services 
Speaker:  Bryan Darrell, Peng., Senior Director , NS Department of Infrastructure Renewal, NS Lands, Halifax NS
Overview: New Waterford Nova Scotia is a small coastal community of approximately 12500 people in Cape Breton. It was once a prosperous mining community. It now shows little of its former glory. Child poverty, addition, unemployment, and a declining population are the current issues for the various levels of gov’t. Aging infrastructure that no longer could meet building code or National standards was consistent across numerous Gov’t departments. What at one time looked like an interesting approach to solve the problem took a twist and became one of the most innovating and exciting development projects in North America.

The original intent was to combine the central utility plant for a number of gov’t services located within a block of each other in this small town. During discussions, the plan grew to actually combine the facilities and share the space this would allow the high school classrooms to be used after hours by the community. The hospital IT services would be connected to the Long Term Care facility and the high school as well. A curriculum is being developed for the high school that will involve time in the labs of the hospital. Students will be given credit hours for working in the Long term care wing of the project. Seniors will be able to watch high school sports by just walking down the hall and looking through a window that overlooks the Gym. The Community has a 500 seat theatre able to host stage performances. One kitchen to prepare food for the entire facility, instead of three. While cost cutting was perhaps the initial plan the concept grew into an environment where the benefits to the community outweigh the reduction in costs.

The concept of breaking the components of the project into tenders small enough that local contractors could be engaged added an aspect of Community Economic Development to the project. This was somewhat new to a gov’t department. The public sector is used to designing and building large projects. The firms that usually participate are well establish. They know and understand the Gov’t protocols. A whole series of new rules had to be created and shared with the industry in order for the smaller players to engage with this project. The local economic spin offs are gaining traction as the project moves forward. The net result is that not only is the infrastructure being renewed but the economy is receiving a boost as well.

Objectives:  At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Do more with less
•  Practice Sustainability
•  Practice Collaboration
TRACK 9B  Heliport Operations Safety  
Speaker: Jeff Young, CPP, CHPA, National Director, Healthcare, GardaWorld, Burnaby BC
Overview:  In November 2020, a medical helicopter delivering an organ for transplant crashed on the hospital roof top landing pad upon arrival. Thankfully, no one was seriously injured, and the organ was recovered and successfully transplanted in the patient. This incident should serve as a reminder to all those healthcare facilities with a heliport to review current procedures to ensure robust heliport safety procedures are in place and all assigned staff are aware and trained.

A formal Heliport Management Program (HMP) was introduced to the Lower Mainland Health Organizations (LMHO) in 2012 to ensure standardization of safety procedures and systems across four distinct healthcare organizations.

Prior to HMP implementation, there were varying degrees of processes and procedures in place across the LMHO which resulted in the near closure of two heliports (at trauma/acute care centre facilities) and the imminent closure of one (at a regional healthcare centre in a high profile resort community). The implementation of the HMP prevented the closure of all three (3) heliports and increased the safety levels of clients and staff across all nine (9) LMHO heliports.

Through training, education, and other established processes and procedures, the Program ensures that our heliports are, and remain, open and operational by meeting or exceeding municipal, provincial, and federal regulatory requirements as well as international aviation safety standards.

The Lower Mainland Health Organizations (LMHO) Heliport Management Program (HMP) is constantly being evaluated by Transport Canada through regular and official Program Validation Inspections (PVI) and ad hoc inspections/visits to our heliports. To date, the LMHO heliports have been in compliance with Transport Canada’s regulatory requirements and our HMP has demonstrated “distinct improvement” since implementation.

By keeping all nine (9) heliports open and operational, the HMP provides our clinical departments with safe and rapid delivery of enhanced emergency medical services to and for our clients and the ability to deliver services as soon as possible to those clients that require urgent/emergency medical care and attention.

Objectives:  At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Identify heliport safety risk issues
•  Describe strategies to mitigate these identified risks
•  Define operational procedures and applicable training to support heliport safety
•  Define the fire & emergency response protocols
TRACK 9C  Building Healthcare Resiliency from Design to Operations 
Speakers:  Nicholas Gabriele, CFPS, Vice President, Global Serviceline Leader Healthcare + Emergency Management, RPA, a Jensen Hughes Company
Dan Walsh, Director, Security Risk Management, Hillard Heintze, a Jensen Hughes Company
Overview:  A Threat and Hazard Vulnerability Assessment is key to developing any organization’s approach to increasing resiliency and emergency preparedness. For healthcare occupancies, it is required that this process inform it’s emergency preparedness program from design to operations. This program will demonstrate how an Hazard Vulnerability Assessment and Security Risk Assessment can inform hospital resiliency during the design and construction phase, and operationally during the Lifecyle of the facility.

Hospitals are not immune to emergencies and disasters but patients, government entities and the public never expect a hospital to fail or stop operations. In recent years, hospitals have experienced disease outbreaks, tornadoes, floods, active shooter attacks and a host of other life-threatening incidents. In some cases, these emergencies and disasters force hospitals to temporarily abandon their main facilities and operate from temporary or alternative care locations. Hospitals must be resilient because, immediately after any disaster, the sick and injured will arrive at their front doorstep.

Given these threat and hazard landscape, its imperative that hospitals adopt a resiliency mindset. Communities across North America expect their hospitals to have the capability and skill set to anticipate and adapt to any situation, including disasters. Since hospitals cannot fail during an emergency or disaster, adopting and implementing a resilience program that identifies multiple response and recovery options is critically important. The first step in building a resiliency program is conducting annual threat and hazard vulnerability assessment.

A thorough, comprehensive hazard vulnerability assessment provides a hospital with an honest evaluation of its ability to effectively respond and recover from an emergency or disaster. A threat and hazard assessment must consider both the physical attributes of the hospital facility and the entire staff and patient environment. Therefore, Its quite important that hospitals consider both manmade threat and natural hazards to gain a wholistic view of its capabilities to remain operational during an emergency or disaster. Only focusing on natural disasters and disease outbreaks will leave a hospital quite susceptible to threats such as workplace violence, active assailant attack, civil unrest and criminal acts. All of these threats can disrupt business operations and inhibit a hospital’s ability to provide care to the most vulnerable members of its community.

This presentation will detail how hospitals and healthcare facilities can conduct threat and vulnerability assessments for new, existing and aging facilities. The value of conducting a threat and hazard vulnerability assessments prior the construction phase for new designs or rehabilitation projects will also be highlighted. Another key presentation focus will be teaching the audience how to translate the results of a threat and hazard assessment into more robust building designs, enhanced security measures, security technology investments and improved emergency response capabilities of hospital personnel. A special emphasis of this presentation will be how to leverage the threat and hazard results to prepare for and successfully respond to an emergency or disaster. Other key areas this presentation will address include the following:

• How aging facilities and out dated technology can exacerbate current threats and hazards
• How staffing levels can impact response and recovery outcomes
• How staff training programs can mitigate or worsen threat and hazard conditions

In essence, the best way to enrich the patient experience is to ensure that a hospital’s doors never close. Adopting a resilient mindset and instituting regular threat and hazard vulnerability assessments is a powerful preparedness tool that any hospital can adopt to protect its patients, staff and community.

Objectives:  At the end of the session participants will be able to:
•  Translate the results of a threat and hazard assessment into more robust building designs, enhanced security measures, security technology investments and improved emergency response capabilities of hospital personnel
•  Be familiarized with Threat and Hazard Vulnerability Assessment as part of resiliency and emergency preparedness
•  Be informed on how staff training programs in resiliency and emergency preparedness.
1400-1415 Transition / Break
1415-1500  TRACK 10: Plenary Session 
  Hotstove Lounge: Roundtable on Climate Impact and Resiliency Design
Speakers:  TBA